OH, DEER…

The Insurance Information Institute (III) reported that deer-to-vehicle collisions are on the rise, spiking 18.3% over the last five years. The average property damage cost of these incidents was $3,050 and if your policy does not cover deer collision, guess who’s paying. Unless you can harangue that deer to write you a check for a cool $3,000, the money will be coming out of your pocket.

Here’s How it Works:

  • All states require motorists to have liability insurance. This means that if you are responsible for causing an accident, your insurance company will pay for any bodily injury or property damage to others…
  • …But there is no mandate that you must insure against damage to your car.  Even the most cautious and conscientious driver can be involved in an accident, though, so you may consider securing collision and comprehensive coverage.  
  • Collision coverage pays for loss due to collision with another vehicle or object (like a tree that came out of nowhere!). It also covers loss due to upset (if your car does a triple lutz or a back flip).
  • Comprehensive coverage provides coverage for any direct damage to your vehicle other than collision. This includes: fire, theft, explosion, earthquake, windstorm, missiles (whoa), falling objects, hail or water, flood, vandalism, riot and civil commotion, glass breakage, contact with birds or animals (oh deer!)

Contact us for a complimentary policy review to ensure that your coverage protects your car adequately: 914-598-3004 or jaime@assetsecurityrm.com

Take Preventative Measures:

The III offers these defensive driving tips to avoid hitting a deer:

  • Be especially attentive from sunset to midnight and during the hours shortly before and after sunrise. These are the highest risk times for deer-vehicle collisions.
  • Drive with caution when moving through deer-crossing zones, in areas known to have a large deer population and in areas where roads divide agricultural fields from forestland. Deer seldom run alone. If you see one deer, others may be nearby.
  • When driving at night, use high beam headlights when there is no oncoming traffic. The high beams will better illuminate the eyes of deer on or near the roadway.
  • Slow down and blow your horn with one long blast to frighten the deer away.
  • Brake firmly when you notice a deer in or near your path, but stay in your lane. Many serious crashes occur when drivers swerve to avoid a deer and hit another vehicle or lose control of their cars.
  • Always wear your seat belt. Most people injured in car/deer crashes were not wearing their seat belt.
  • Do not rely on devices such as deer whistles, deer fences and reflectors to deter deer. These devices have not been proven to reduce deer-vehicle collisions.

If your vehicle strikes a deer, get your car off the road, if possible, and call the police.

Happy and safe driving!

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